Month: August 2015

(PART II) FORBIDDEN ISLANDS: Basilan and Zamboanga City

the breathtaking beach in Malamawi Island in Isabela, Basilan

the breathtaking beach in Malamawi Island in Isabela, Basilan

Basilan Provincial Capitol

Basilan Provincial Capitol

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Before sunrise, we find ourselves on a plane to Zamboanga City, our jump-off point to a province our mothers vehemently forbade us from visiting-Basilan. The name evokes fear, and admittedly, I associate the place with terrorists and their mutilated victims. Perhaps expecting an occasional gunfire or at least a little tension in the air, we are surprised to find Isabela City, its capital, to be just like any rustic city we’ve been to. Bustling streets and business establishments. Boisterous teenagers on the sidewalk. A crowded Jollibee. “This is our typical day. Contrary to what you see on television, our city is safe.” assures Ate Yanyan Pineda, our vivacious guide from the tourism office. According to her, Mayor Cherrylyn Santos-Akbar is keen on reversing the negative image brought about by the Abu Sayaff by ensuring tight security at all times.

Basilan is home to several ethnic groups, such as the Yakan, Tausug and Badjao, whose stilt villages fringe the Isabela Channel. Though most of these groups thrive on fishing, agriculture is the province’s main source of livelihood. Aside from the typical palay, corn and coconut, Isabela’s rolling hills are strewn with coffee plants and rubber trees.

A scenic boat ride along the channel, followed by a quick habal-habal ride, takes us to a secluded slice in Malamawi Island, where a beautiful white beach awaits us. The sand is fine and soft like flour and the water, clean and sparkling. If the province’s notorious reputation has done any good, it has kept Malamawi Island away from irresponsible tourists. There are few cottages for rent, and soon, overnight facilities will be completed. “Aren’t you scared of our province?” asks one of the locals. “Do I have a reason to be scared?” I ask him back. He smiles, and tells me that just like any other place, unfortunate events happen sporadically. “It is generally peaceful here,” he declares. Though pressed for time, we linger a little more. I tell you, the water here is irresistible.

Malamawi Island in Isabela, Basilan

Malamawi Island in Isabela, Basilan

Malamawi Island in Isabela, Basilan

Malamawi Island in Isabela, Basilan

Malamawi Island in Isabela, Basilan

Malamawi Island in Isabela, Basilan

Ate Yanyan then takes us to Cabunbata Falls, a roadside scenery located just 7 kilometers from the city center. Concealed by a few Mahogany and Rubber trees, it is a perfect place to just sit meditatively and listen to the gentle cascade and the whistling of the birds among the lush vegetation. We also drop by the Rubber tree plantation and the rubber factory. Embarrassingly, I didn’t know rubbers come from trees. According to a factory attendant, rubber production is a meticulous process. They carefully tap the trees as early as two in the morning because the cool air encourages the latex to flow freely. Rubber is among the major agricultural products of the city.

Cabunbata Falls

Cabunbata Falls

inside the rubber factory

inside the rubber factory

inside the rubber factory

inside the rubber factory

The Rubber Tree Plantation

The Rubber Tree Plantation

the process of "tapping" is used to collect latex from the Rubber Tree

the process of “tapping” is used to collect latex from the Rubber Tree

Latin City

Sunset finds us back in Zamboanga City, munching on a popular snack called Knickerbocker (fresh fruits with milk and ice cream) at Paseo del Mar, aseafront parkway that is clustered with bars and restaurants. Locals and tourists converge here at dusk to enjoy the view, the fresh air and the good food. Like Tawi-Tawi and Basilan, Zamboanga is unfortunately plagued with a notorious image. Remember the siege two years ago? “Everything is peaceful now as it normally is,” assures Huge, our friend who is a local. The local government’s effort to turn the tide of fear is evident on the presence of police officers in public places.

a popular dessert in Zamboanga, KnickerBocker

a popular dessert in Zamboanga, KnickerBocker

Paseo Del Mar

Paseo Del Mar

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boodlefight at Paseo Del Mar

boodlefight at Paseo Del Mar

 

When you visit this progressive city, don’t be surprised when the least Spanish-looking person inside the jeepney says “Pasahe, por favor!” It doesn’t take a genius to see Spain’s legacy to the Zamboangenos. The Chavacano dialect (a fusion of Spanish and Visayan languages), old stone houses and the ancient coral walls of Fort Pilar are just a few of the obvious ones. Zamboanga City was once a Spanish settlement and a garrison town that protected Spain’s interest in the region. In 1635, Fort Pilar was built as a defense fortress against the Moro pirates and raiders upon the request of the Jesuit missionaries. An important landmark, it stands today as an outdoor Roman Catholic shrine and a museum.

Fort Pilar

Fort Pilar

the Catholoc Shrine in Fort Pilar

the Catholoc Shrine in Fort Pilar

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Fort Pilar

Fort Pilar

A Catholic Shrine in Fort Pilar

A Catholic Shrine in Fort Pilar

A Catholic Shrine in Fort Pilar

A Catholic Shrine in Fort Pilar

A Catholic Shrine in Fort Pilar

A Catholic Shrine in Fort Pilar

On our last day, we decide to check out the remote Merloquet Falls. Located in the village of Sibulao around 78 kilometers east of the city, the waterfalls is only for those who are willing to endure a 2-hour bus ride from the city center, a 30-minute habal-habal ride and a 10-minute trek. Determined, we proceed despite the heavy downpour and the bumpy motorcycle ride. Our exhaustion vanishes when we see the wide and gorgeous cascade draping beautifully on the moss-covered cliff. The falls has an upper tier that is not visible from the ground. Smaller but just as beautiful, it can be accessed by climbing a slippery and difficult trail, with a rope and the trees’ undergrowth as handholds. I sit with my back against the cascade for a while. The natural massage is pure bliss.

Merloquet Falls

Merloquet Falls

Merloquet Falls

Merloquet Falls

Merloquet Falls

Merloquet Falls

Don’t leave Zamboanga City without visiting the Canelar Trading Center. Inside the open-air shopping mecca are endless rows of colorful and intricately designed malongs, bags, batik dresses and sarongs. Serious bargain hunters would be delighted to find Malaysian and Indonesian products, from clothes to chocolates, at dirt-cheap prices.

Admittedly, I brave these forbidden places for bragging rights but I end up humbled and educated. While most think that terrorism is an everyday occurrence in the region, we experience the people’s genuine warmth and their tremendously rich culture. Not everything you hear in the news is true.

the explosion of colours at the Canelar Trading Center

the explosion of colours at the Canelar Trading Center

the explosion of colours at the Canelar Trading Center

the explosion of colours at the Canelar Trading Center

the explosion of colours at the Canelar Trading Center

the explosion of colours at the Canelar Trading Center

 

Getting There:

1.)  ZAMBOANGA CITY– There are daily flights from Manila, Cebu and Davao to Zamboanga City

  • Fort Pilar, Paseo Del Mar and the Canelar Treading Center are just a tricycle-ride away from anywhere in the city.
  • To reach Merloquet Falls, ride a bus bound for Ipil, Pagadian or Dipolog at the terminal. Alight at the bus stop in Brgy. Vitali. (2 hours, Php 130) Hire a habal-habal to Merloquet Falls in Brgy. Sibulao. (30 minutes, Php 130)

2.)  BASILAN– Fly to Zamboanga City, ride a tricycle to the port and ride a Weesam Express to Isabela City in Basilan (45 minutes, Php 150) Unless you personally know a local who can show you around, make sure to coordinate with the tourism office for accredited guides.

  • There are small boats that go regularly to Malamawi Island from the Isabele City port. Just ask around. (5 minutes, Php 5 fare)

Who to Call:

1.)  Zamboanga City Tourism Office(062) 992-6242

2.)  Yanyan Pineda of Basilan Tourism Office 09158553785

 

 

 

(PART I) FORBIDDEN ISLANDS: Tawi-Tawi

the clear waters of Celebes Sea

the clear waters of Celebes Sea

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

sunrise in Celebes Sea

sunrise in Celebes Sea

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

a sea cucumber vendor

a sea cucumber vendor

Sea cucumbers

Sea cucumbers

Floating village in Sibutu

Floating village in Sibutu

The tide is low, and a handful of Tausug villagers, who live in stilt houses near the shore, paddles into the shallows in their small hand-carved boats to collect seaweedsfromthe filaments mounted on wooden poles. The silence is broken only by the occasional squawks of the Egrets and the swish of the farmers in the placid waters of Celebes Sea. Beaming from ear to ear, Joyce claps her hands in excitement. “Everyone warned me about this place. I never imagined I’d be here,” she says. Had we flinched upon hearing about the recent bomb explosions, kidnappings and beheadings in the infamous provinces in Mindanao, we wouldn’t have seen Omapuy Island, which for us is one of the country’s most beautiful islands. The island, whose wide swathes of powdery white sand glow from afar, is tucked away in Tawi-Tawi, the southernmost province in the country.

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

seaweed farmer

seaweed farmer

seaweed farmer in Omapuy Ilsnad

seaweed farmer in Omapuy Ilsnad

Tawi-Tawi shares sea borders with the island of Borneo to the west. It is a peaceful home to several indigenous tribes: the Sama, who comprise a large percentage of the population; the Tausug, a Moro-ethnic group who are dominant politically and economically; the Badjao, the seafaring gypsies; and the Jama Mapun, a group largely found in the isolated Cagayan Mapun and Turtle Island Group.

An ARMM territory, Tawi-Tawi looks nothing like an island of dread. With bright-eyed enthusiasm, Ate Nursida Jaluddin, a tourism staff at the Sanga-Sanga Airport in Bongao, makes last-minute tour arrangements for us after our original guide bailed out without notice. After a hefty breakfast of satti (grilled chicken and rice drenched in spicy curry sauce), junai (steamed rice mixed with burnt coconut grates and paired with hard-boiled egg) and tiyulaitum (beef stew that is also blackened with burnt coconut grates), we board a lantsa (a large wooden boat) at the bustling Chinese Pier. The pungent smell of marang, durian and dried fish wafts in the air. The lantsa is brimming not just with passengers but also with huge boxes of goods that can be bought only in Bongao, the province’s economic capital. A four-hour boat ride takes us to the humble town of Sibutu, the jump-off point to the remote islands in our itinerary.

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Satti, grilled chicken in spicy curry sauce

Satti, grilled chicken in spicy curry sauce

inside the lantsa

inside the lantsa

the bustling chinese pier in Bongao

the bustling chinese pier in Bongao

Team Pabebe with Ate Nurside of the Tourism Office

Team Pabebe with Ate Nurside of the Tourism Office

inside the lantsa

inside the lantsa

 

Bud Bongao from afar

Bud Bongao from afar

At The Southern Tip

“Surreal!” We unanimously agree about the feeling of reaching Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the Philippines, just 40 kilometers away from the Malaysian state of Sabah. Its gorgeous transparent waters reveal hectares of luxuriant sea grass and corals. “On a clear day, the mountains of Sabah can be seen from this island,” says Alnour, our guide, as our boat crawls over the coralline reef. Here, the Tausug and the Sama Dilaut, who share the bounties of the sea for livelihood, live peacefully in a small settlement along the white beach. On a typical day, one would find women and children on the shore, sorting out their seaweed harvests before hanging them on wooden poles to dry.

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

seaweed farming is a major livelihood of the Tausug and Sama Dilaut in Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

seaweed farming is a major livelihood of the Tausug and Sama Dilaut in Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

Saluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

the old and the new lighthouses in Saluag Island

the old and the new lighthouses in Saluag Island

the clear waters ofSaluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

the clear waters ofSaluag Island, the southernmost island in the country

the clear waters of Celebes Sea

the clear waters of Celebes Sea

Venice Of The South

Not far from Saluag Island is the municipality of Sitangkai, a lively settlement that stands not on land but on reef. Approaching Sitangkai is like entering a different world. It has a one-kilometer marine causeway that is fringed with stores that sell dry wares, fresh produce and even bizarre merchandise like dried stingrays and puffer fish, which according to a vendor is actually safe to eat. Here, footbridges connect one house to another and pump boats are the only mode of transportation. Traffic usually happens in the morning, when people from nearby islands come to purchase supplies. Many peddlers would crowd the 20-feet wide waterway to sell directly from their boats.

Besides the unusual trade and commerce, seaweed farming is also another source of livelihood in the island. In fact, Sitangkai is the largest producer of seaweeds in the country.

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

stilt houses

stilt houses

stilt houses

stilt houses

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

a vendor in the municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

a vendor in the municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

fried Kilor of Breadfruit

fried Kilor of Breadfruit

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

The floating municipality of Sitangkai, dubbed as the Venice of the South

a pufferfish vendor in Sitangkai

a pufferfish vendor in Sitangkai

dried stingray in Sitangkai

dried stingray in Sitangkai

seaweed vendor in Sitangkai :)

seaweed vendor in Sitangkai 🙂

Team Pabebe in Sitangkai

Team Pabebe in Sitangkai

stilt houses

stilt houses

Holy Ground

Setting foot in Simunul Island is another surreal experience. “We are standing exactly on the birthplace of Islam in the Philippines,” says our guide. We are speechless with excitement. In 1380 AD, an Arab missionary and trader from Mecca named Sheikh Karim Ul-Makhdum arrived in Simunul Island to preach Islam to our tree-worshiping ancestors, long before the Spaniards came. Today, a mosque named after him stands in Brgy. Tubig -Indangan as an important landmark where the first Islamic temple in the archipelago was built. Inside it are four intricately designed Ipil-wood pillars, which are said to be from the original 14th century mosque.

While many believe that the sheik’s remains are interred just within the mosque’s premises, others assert that his real grave is the one enshrined in Barangay Tandubanak in Sibutu. The latter is considered a national heritage site. Both graveyards are revered pilgrimage sites of Filipino Muslims.

the clear waters of Celebes Sea

the clear waters of Simunul Island, the birthplace if Islam in the Philippines

Sheikh Makhdum Mosque, a landmark of the very first mosque in the Philippines

Sheikh Makhdum Mosque, a landmark of the very first mosque in the Philippines

Sheikh Makhdum Mosque, a landmark of the very first mosque in the Philippines

Sheikh Makhdum Mosque, a landmark of the very first mosque in the Philippines

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Sheikh Mahkdum's grave in Simunul Island

Sheikh Mahkdum’s grave in Simunul Island

Sheikh Makhdum Memorial in Sibutu

Sheikh Makhdum Memorial in Sibutu

Sacred Mountain

“Say a prayer when you reach the summit, then promise to come back if your wish comes true,” says Lance, our guide to Bud Bongao, the highest peak in Tawi-Tawi. We are unsure if he is serious, until we meet families who hike up just to pray and meditate. Soaring 340 meters above the sea, Bud Bongao (“bud” is Tausug for mountain) dominates Tawi-Tawi’s landscape and is easily recognized from afar due to its distinct U-shape. The trail is clear, and lofty Molave, Kalantas and Lumbang trees cover our heads from the harsh daylight as we climb. Sweat-drenched, we walk in silence as we near the tampat (shrine) just below the peak, where pilgrims whisper their prayers. We see three holy shrines not far from each other, and according to our guide, one of Sheikh Makhdum’s original followers was buried in the vicinity. Upon reaching the summit, the vast greenery below and the calm glistening waters of the Celebes Sea render us breathless and oblivious of the scorching high-noon sun. Besides being a pilgrimage site, Bud Bongao is also a treasure trove of biodiversity. It is home to the Pugad Lawin, the Orange Albatross, monitor lizards, the Short-nosed Fruit Bats and the Philippine Monkeys/ long-tailed macaques, which we have to please with bread offerings halfway through our descent.

at the peak of Bud Bonggao

at the peak of Bud Bonggao

a Philippine Monkey in Bud Bonggao

a Philippine Monkey in Bud Bonggao

Philippine Monkeys in Bud Bonggao

Philippine Monkeys in Bud Bonggao

the peak of Bud Bonggao

the peak of Bud Bonggao

the peak of Bud Bonggao

the peak of Bud Bonggao

the peak of Bud Bonggao

the peak of Bud Bonggao

a "tampat" or holy shrine near the summit of Bud Bonggao

a “tampat” or holy shrine near the summit of Bud Bonggao

our uncomfortable but fun boat ride from Sibutu to Bongao

our uncomfortable but fun boat ride from Sibutu to Bongao

Provincial Capitol Building of Tawi-Tawi

Provincial Capitol Building of Tawi-Tawi

Getting There:

1.)  Cebu Pacific has flights from Zamboanga City to Bongao, Tawi-Tawi.

2.)  To go to OMAPUY and SALUAG ISLANDS, go to the Chinese Pier in Bongao as early as 10 a.m. and ride a lantsa bound for SIBUTU (3 hours, Php 200), the jump-off point to these 2 islands. There’s only one boat to Sibutu daily. Make sure to coordinate with the tourism office beforehand for the accommodation and island hopping. There are no hotels in Sibutu and rates of the accommodation depend on the owner of the house you’ll spend the night in. Boats for island hopping also depend on the owners. We spent around Php 5,000 for the land and sea transportation to Omapuy, Saluag and Sitangkai.

3.)   If you want to go to SIMUNUL, the jump-off point is Bongao. Just go directly to the Tourism Office at the airport to inquire for boats. You may also want to check out Panampangan Island, which many travelers have been raving about. A speedboat to both Simunul and Panampangan can be as expensive as Php 8,000 so bring your adventurous friends to save on expenses. Bawal ang pabebe sa Tawi-Tawi! haha J

4.)  To go to BUD BONGAO, coordinate also with the Tourism Office at the airport for accredited tour guides.

Who to Call:

1.)  Salve Pescadera of the Tawi-Tawi Tourism Office- 09051547865/09106716367

2.)  Nursida Jaluddin of the Tourism Office at the airport- 09206140860

 

floating village in Sibutu

floating village in Sibutu

Team Pabebe

Team Pabebe

halo-halo by the bay

halo-halo by the bay

Pastil, a Tausug delicacy with bison as filling. It is usually paired with vinegar

Pastil, a Tausug delicacy with bison as filling. It is usually paired with vinegar

boatmaking is one of Badjao's livelihood.

boatmaking is one of Badjao’s livelihood.

Fried Kilor or Breadfruit makes a good snack

Fried Kilor or Breadfruit makes a good snack

Alnour, our protective guide. :)

Alnour, our protective guide. 🙂

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stilt houses

stilt houses

stilt houses

stilt houses

the clear waters of Celebes Sea

the clear waters of Celebes Sea

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the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

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the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

the breathtaking Omapuy Island

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a backyard cemetery in Sibutu

a backyard cemetery in Sibutu

cows are pretty common in Tawi-Tawi

cows are pretty common in Tawi-Tawi

only the freshest seafood in Tawi-Tawi

only the freshest seafood in Tawi-Tawi

roadtrip to Brgy Tandu Owak in Sibutu, our jumpoff point to Saluag Island

roadtrip to Brgy Tandu Owak in Sibutu, our jumpoff point to Saluag Island

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